Category: Architecture

Olveston Historic Home; an insiders view

Posted: 14 April 2015 in: Architecture, Collections, Restoration · Tagged: , , ,

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Who were the Jacobeans?

Olveston’s lively profile made up of differently shaped gables is a feature of Jacobean revival architecture | Osbert Lancaster gently parodied the Olveston style as ‘Pont St Dutch’ in Pillar to Post (1938).

Olveston’s lively profile made up of differently shaped gables is a feature of Jacobean revival architecture | Osbert Lancaster gently parodied the Olveston style as ‘Pont St Dutch’ in Pillar to Post (1938).

Architectural taste at the end of the nineteenth century turned towards the first Elizabethan era, some 300 years before. There was a strong element of imperial pride in that particular point in British history. The nation had begun its long period of influence that reached a peak with London as the largest city in the world and the British Empire stretching across the globe to eventually reach New Zealand. Read more »

Posted: 11 August 2014 in: Architecture · Leave a comment

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What if?

The Theomins had many complex decisions to make when they decided to build on their Royal Terrace site. They were aware of what local architects could achieve, having visited the homes built for the small Jewish community in Dunedin. They were familiar with Salmond & Vanes who later designed the Princes St building where the Theomin’s musical instrument business was located. Whatever the reason, the opportunity to engage an overseas architect to design the house was made part of an extensive trip abroad in 1902. Along with many successful colonial businessmen, David Theomin spent a great deal of time out of the country. Dorothy was attending Rodean School in England and the family would meet and travel during the holidays. While visiting Canada, David Theomin obtained sketch plans for his house in Dunedin from Toronto architect Charles J. Gibson (1862–1935). Gibson ran a busy practice and built houses for prominent Toronto industrialists but Theomin rejected the plans and went on London where he visited Ernest George who was offered the commission for Olveston. The intriguing question is what might have Olveston become if Gibson’s plans had been used? Would it now be one of New Zealand’s finest historic buildings? Read more »

Posted: 30 July 2014 in: Architecture · Leave a comment

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